Michigan Trigger Law and Texas Pre-Roe Ban

michigan trigger law

The Michigan trigger law prohibits abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. The ban is also in effect in Kentucky and Texas. The Supreme Court is currently considering declaring these pre-Roe bans constitutional. In the meantime, the Michigan Supreme Court has temporarily blocked the ban for state and county officials. Although it is unclear what the ultimate outcome of the case will be, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer successfully sought an order to block the law.

What does this mean for Ann Arbor and Michigan?

Michigan’s constitution protects the right to an abortion

The right to an abortion is protected under Michigan’s constitution. This right was established by Roe v. Wade. But there are many opponents of this decision. Abortion rights advocates are appealing to the state’s supreme court to override the state board’s decision. If the Michigan Supreme Court agrees to overturn the state board’s decision, the right to an abortion will become an enforceable right in the state.

Michigan’s trigger law bans abortions after six weeks of pregnancy

Michigan’s trigger law bans abortions as early as six weeks of pregnancy. The measure passed last year has been challenged in court and may be in jeopardy of repeal. Some Republican legislators want to replace it with a less stringent version. The ban was intentionally made strict in an effort to spark a legal challenge to Roe v. Wade. However, Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy insists life begins at conception.

Kentucky’s trigger law bans abortions after six weeks of pregnancy

The state of Michigan has passed a law banning abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. However, the ban has been challenged in court. It is still in place in some counties, such as Oakland, but has been temporarily blocked by the state Supreme Court. The court is weighing whether to declare the pre-Roe ban constitutional.

Texas’ trigger law bans abortions at all stages of pregnancy

Texas’ trigger law prohibits abortions at any stage of pregnancy and carries with it the potential for life in prison for those who perform them. The law also carries a $100,000 fine for each violation. The state’s Republican-dominated General Assembly is expected to consider more restrictive laws against abortion during its next session in January.

Florida’s trigger law bans abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy

While most states ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, Florida does not have a trigger law, which would mean that an abortion ban would begin immediately once Roe v. Wade is overturned. Instead, the state’s trigger law prohibits abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, but does not ban all abortions. Those procedures are legal if they are medically necessary to save a woman’s life or prevent a major bodily function from becoming serious or life-threatening. The CDC reports that only 2% of abortions are performed after 15 weeks.

Mississippi’s trigger law bans abortions except in medical emergencies

Mississippi’s trigger law bans abortions from a woman’s first trimester. The law is in place to protect the life of the mother. After the midterm elections, Republicans in the state’s Legislature are expected to maintain control. However, they haven’t yet acted on the trigger law.

Tennessee’s trigger law bans abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy

Tennessee’s trigger law makes it illegal to perform abortions after 15 weeks. The state is considering enforcing the law, which would effectively criminalize the practice. Currently, the state only allows physicians to perform abortions in certain circumstances. However, a ruling from the Supreme Court could change this.

Missouri’s trigger law bans abortions after six weeks

A new law has made it illegal to perform abortions in Missouri after six weeks. Missouri’s trigger law, which was tacked onto another bill as an amendment, prohibits abortions after that point unless the mother is in a medical emergency. The law also makes it a class B felony to induce an abortion.